Video Recording Guide

This article is specifically intended for my studio’s online recitals due to the Covid-19 pandemic. I will be periodically updating this article throughout the spring 2020 as we see what works and what doesn’t.

Introduction

I dedicated my entire monthly practice corner article to technology for online lessons. I realized that a video and audio recording guide would be helpful, and to get it started now versus waiting until early May! Recordings are important for posting to the Internet and social media, as well as for self-study. You can learn a lot by listening back to yourself when you’re not engaged in playing.

However, we’ll all need to learn these skills as we seek to document a crazy semester on video since we’re unlikely to have an in-person recital in May. The basic idea is to have everyone video record themselves, submit their recordings to me, and I’ll create a couple of recitals out of them. Let’s first discuss how to do the recordings.

Video Software

iOS (Apple)

Since everyone has an iPhone or iPad, I’m going to start here. You want to use an iPad if you have a choice, but an iPhone will do. First, if you don’t have iMovie, download it from the App Store. It’s Apple software, which means it’s not only free, but fairly easy to use. I’ve made a short YouTube video that takes you through the entire process, from recording to exporting. The one snag will be that you may not have Dropbox on your device, which means you’ll have to do the transfer from your PC or Mac. This support post from Apple should do the trick to establish a connection between your device and your computer, if you don’t have one established. Please transfer the file(s) in MOV format to the Dropbox link I have provided. I will convert your file to MP4 format using the VLC Media Player.

Windows PC

You can also record using your laptop or a desktop using an external Webcam. Microsoft offers the built-in Camera program in Windows 10 to shoot video. I haven’t tried it, but it appears to be simple to be use. When you finish shooting your video, you can upload it to Dropbox directly from your PC. Please make sure it’s in MP4 format so that I don’t have to do any file conversion.

Device Placement

If you don’t have a microphone stand, music stand, or something that your device can attach to or sit on, then use a small table built up with books and put it a foot or two to the side and behind the pianist. The angle used in my YouTube video above works well. Also, make sure your device is placed in landscape. You probably don’t have to think about this if you’re using a tablet. However, if you’re using a phone, place it so it is wider than it is high.

Record Early and Often

Please don’t wait until the last moment to do your recording. It’s good to do some testing recording, to make sure that you have your camera set at a good place, and to make sure that your playing is as good when you’re practicing as when you’re recording. Although playing for a camera is different than for a live audience, you may face some of the same fears. It’s better to get used to playing for, and ignoring, the technology!

Grouping Your Recordings

I will also let you know how to group together your recordings, but the general guideline is below. Also, super important: Between movements, or between pieces, please put your hands in your lap for two Mississippis (one-Mississippi, two-Mississippi). Then, put them back on the keyboard and continue when ready.

  • If you are a younger student playing several short pieces, please record them all in the same file, in the order that we decide.
  • If you are playing a sonatina, please record all of the movements in the same file. If you are recording shorter pieces, you may put those in a separate file.
  • If you are involved in the Debussy Children’s Corner project, please record those pieces separately. If you are assigned two pieces, you can either record them consecutively, in performance order, as part of the same file. Or, you can record them as separate files and I can splice them together.

Dropbox

Hopefully, all of you already use Dropbox. If not, I’d strongly urge you to try it out, even if it’s just for our project. It’s really the gold standard for cloud-based file storage, and works incredibly well for exchanging files securely. If you would like an invitation to get started the software, I’d be glad to provide. It doesn’t benefit me at all, to my knowledge at least, since I’m on a paid plan with massive storage. However, with the free plan, you often can get more storage simply by inviting others to sign up for the software.

Permission to Post

I am sending a SurveyMonkey request that adds video recording to the photo permissions I sought earlier in the program year. I didn’t anticipate making any videos, until Covid-19 shook up our world, so I want to make sure you are okay with my posting plans. I am planning to offer a private Zoom event for those who either don’t get the recordings to me in time or don’t want to have their videos uploaded for public viewing.

Stay Tuned for Updates

This video and audio recording guide will remain a working document for us, as we find out what works (and what doesn’t). I’ll update and send you a link or reminder once any major changes are made. Let’s see what kind of playing fun we can have, even if we have to do it within our own four walls!

Gustave Caillebotte painting
La Leçon de Piano by Gustave Caillebotte at Musée Marmatton Monet (Paris 16th). Courtesy Wikimedia.
Last Updated 2020-05-03 | Originally Posted 2020-04-13

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