Technology for Online Lessons

Introduction

There’s a lot of information in this article, but the easiest and most actionable information is at the top. Reading my bit on Device Placement and watching Nicola’s short video goes far. If you want to tweak bandwidth, upgrade or add equipment, read on.

My default app for online lessons is Facetime. I can also schedule a Zoom lesson, if you don’t use Apple products. However, recently Zoom recently applied a 40-minute time limit to all 1:1 sessions on their free version.

Device Placement

If you don’t have a microphone stand, music stand, or something that your device can attach to or sit on, then use a small table built up with books and put it a foot or two to the side and behind the pianist. The angle used in my YouTube video above works well. Also, make sure your device is placed in landscape. This is super important, especially if you’re using a phone. Rotate it 90 degrees so that it is oriented wider versus taller!

man playing piano in park
Man playing piano in park. Courtesy Needpix.com


Device Setup Video
    My mentor, Nicola Cantan, made this device setup video. I can’t do it better. Go back to the beginning if you want to hear the intro and her lighting suggestions.

Bandwidth

There are several things you can do to make sure you have the best speed possible. One is to call your provider to ask what’s available. I did this just before the Covid-19 pandemic, and received a higher-speed connection for a lower price. I don’t say you will be as lucky, but the squeaky wheel gets the grease!

One further tip is to try to test your upload speed on whatever device you are using. Yes, I did say upload and not download. This is not Netflix, where all you care about is download speed. If you want me to guide you in your playing, I need to receive it well. That’s only possible with good upload speed.

Test your upload speed on your device using Google, or the old standard Speedtest by Ookla. Every time I find a problem with bandwidth, I use the Speedtest app. I might be the problem, but so may you! Or, in some rare cases, the connection is great at both ends but traffic is too heavy in the middle.

If you have at least 10 Mbps, upload and download, that’s typically good enough. If you don’t have that much, there are several things you can do:

  • Ask your other family members to stop streaming video or playing online games during your lesson. Web browsing and Social Media, without video, shouldn’t be a problem.
  • If you’re using a laptop or desktop, directly connect via a network cable to your modem. These cables come in lengths of 50 and 100 feet, and are worth the trouble to plug and unplug!
  • If you’re using a phone or tablet, you must rely on strong Wi-Fi. Thus, try to move your modem closer to your piano, or even your piano, if it’s electronic, closer to your modem. If neither is possible, perhaps upgrade your modem, if it’s more than several years old, or get a repeater to boost your signal.

Device

Tablets are better than phones. Typically, larger devices have better cameras, audio, and battery life. Remember to charge your device before a lesson. If that’s not possible, plug it in to a charger during the lesson if your battery is low. Laptops have the advantage of a larger screen size, but they don’t necessarily work better than tablets. Plus, their size almost dictates having a music or specialty laptop stand for support.



Technical Tips to Optimize Your Device for Faster Wi-Fi
  • Turn off background app refresh
  • Free up storage space to enable optimal buffering
  • Reboot your device periodically
  • Clear the cache regularly (However, this means having to enter your passwords again)

Device Stand and Holder

Many of you are using a table or chair with books to prop up your device. If you have a basic black music stand, by Wenger or Manhasset, that can work even better! The best placement is a couple of feet past the end of the keyboard, and high enough to show both the keys and the student’s face as well.

If you’re looking to spend money for a better solution, I would recommend an old-fashioned weighted-base stand. It’s cheap and it works great. It’s not made for the gig bag. If you want a tripod stand that can be easily folded up, I’d recommend a super-expensive Konig & Meyer (K&M) model, because they’re extremely well made. I had a much cheaper Samson stand, but I got tired of the hand adjustment screws never holding their place despite tightening way past what should have been adequate.

You will need to also purchase a mount to put on top of that stand as well. They are made specifically for phone or tablet. Although I have a super-expensive K&M here, too, you can get away with buying a top-rated bargain model off of Amazon. I like the K&M because it’s practically impossible for my device to fall out of a K&M mount. I’ve had crashes out of the no-name brands, not because they’re badly made, but because there’s not the same safety mechanism.

Software (FaceTime or Zoom)

I am currently using FaceTime on my iPad. The problem is that FaceTime only allows that simple one-camera approach. I am often scurrying home from in-person lessons, or need to leave home after a video lesson to teach in person. My plan is to eventually use Zoom more often, instead of FaceTime, so that I can set up my second camera with an overhead view of the keys. It provides a higher-caliber online lesson.

If you don’t use Apple products, I can also use Zoom on my tablet. I just need to know in advance since those calls have to be scheduled; they are harder to create on the fly.

Microphone

Your built-in microphone is probably sufficient. This is a really tricky one, since most inexpensive microphones have become much more expensive due to current circumstances. The Fifine microphone I purchased a few weeks ago was $5 above pre-Covid-19 times, and is currently selling for $5 more than I paid. A lavalier or lapel microphone is also probably fine. There is a risk in overpaying for any microphone right now.

Also, pay attention to the connector. A lightning connector will only work on older Apple devices, since Apple abandoned that connector for USB C in 2019. The Fifine microphone comes with an old USB A connector, which is perfect for a PC. An inexpensive adapter can also make it useful on an old or new Apple device.

In Conclusion

Yes, you already have most of the technology for online lessons! So now you have to consider if there are any facets of online lessons you’d like to improve? The best improvement to any online lesson is by maximizing bandwidth and have an optimized device. Those two tasks are most likely free.

Most of the other ideas suggested aren’t free. Purchasing a device holder and stand adds to the online lesson experience, and will be useful past social distancing. So would purchasing an add-on microphone. Both are important steps in making quality recording for posting recordings to the Internet or simply for critique yourself. I’d recommend thinking long and hard about the proper way to buy technology. As Nicola Cantan from Colourful Keys says, figure out what your problem is first. Then, find a shiny tech device to solve it, and not vice-versa!

Image by Divya Gupta. Courtesy Pixabay.
Last Updated 2022-06-12 | Originally Posted 2020-04-12

Summer Project – Online Lesson Academy

This post, Summer Project – Online Lesson Academy, is the second in a three-part series under the category of Piano Teaching. I invested in a reasonably priced online course given by the Upbeat Piano Teachers, a team of two – Sara Campbell and Tracy Selle. Sara was mentioned in a Webinar given by the Music Teachers National Association (MTNA). As a result, I listed her as a piano teaching resource in this post, which speaks about her own site and blog, Sara’s Music Studio.

So far, so good! All of the information was helpful and well put together. Now it’s time to do the homework assignments during the short window of time the course instructors are available to facilitate. There are two Q&A sessions, after which we are on our own.

What is the point? Technology has made online lessons possible. There are just several pieces of equipment needed to get started, including a laptop and a Webcam, or just a tablet with its built-in camera. Add high-speed Internet and you’re ready to go! It’s not much more complicated than that.

So why use it? The most obvious reason is to eliminate the need for makeup lessons when the problem is getting to the lesson. It could be inclement weather, a transportation issue, or even minor illness. Makeup lessons are the bane of music teachers everywhere, so why not try online lessons to teach during the allocated teaching time? There are some instructors who extend this technology to provide distance learning. This can occur if either the student or the teacher moves away, but both parties want to continue lessons. It also allows a teacher with special skills to teach outside of her geography.

One of the surprises of the seminar was the idea of video learning. This is offered where the student can’t show up for his lesson and isn’t available for an online lesson. The teacher can use the lesson time to create a customized video with specific instructions for the student. The student then has to watch the video within a short window and perform the assignments to be ready for the next lesson. It’s also possible to create a series of generic video lessons ahead of time to be offered to a student when it’s not possible to create a customized video.

That’s it so far! I’m excited to do all of this work, and then engage with parents and students to get started!

Posted on 2018-05-28