Auf Wiedersehen Bach WTC Book One

Introduction

I’m sure that the majority of the congregation where I work in Bella Vista, Arkansas, are not even aware of this occasion. On February 4, 2018, I played the First Prelude and Fugue in C Major from the Well-Tempered Clavier, Book One, by J.S. Bach at First Methodist. The prelude has been quoted by other composers through the centuries, including Charles Gounod in his setting of the Ave Maria. Today I complete that journey with the Twenty-Fourth Prelude and Fugue in B minor. It’s my way to say Auf Wiedersehen Bach WTC Book One!

Fans Help

Thankfully, I have a group of loyal fans who have been with me every step of the way. I also have some friends and colleagues from far-flung places with whom I want to share the performance, so I’m broadcasting it via Facebook Live just before noon today (CST). Although it’s not good to be boastful, I’m proud of following through a commitment to learn all of these gems. I was not a big fan of these pieces in music school, something I first shared in my blog post celebrating the beginning of this project.

The B minor Prelude and Fugue

Before reminiscing about the entire cycle, I have to point out how odd this last entry is. Both the prelude and fugue have tempo markings, andante and largo, respectively. None of the other 23 preludes and fugues have any tempo indications. There are repeats indicated on both the A and B section of the prelude. There are no other repeat marks in the entire book.

The fugue is 6 pages long, matched only by the A minor fugue. However, this fugue carries a pathos and chromaticism that is unparalleled in the rest of the set. Upon hearing the fugue subject, which is the single voice that sets the tone for what follows, you know that a wild ride is coming. It brings to mind the opening of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, or the opening of the Prelude to Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde. While Tristan is almost 5 hours long, this set of pieces wraps up in about 12 minutes.

Overall Learnings

One of the benefits of playing the entire Well-Tempered Clavier, in my case just the first book, is getting to know Bach better. Many of the great composers have referenced these pieces; Robert Schumann called them “the pianist’s daily bread.” Many great pianists learned and performed them, even those you wouldn’t think of as Bach specialists. I enjoyed how Bach took standard forms and exploited them for their full worth. Each prelude was sometimes very simple, but occasionally it was just as contrapuntal as the attached fugue. Although I didn’t learn these pieces to study voice leading, harmony, or improvisation, I subconsciously absorbed all of these concepts.

To look at this from a wider lens, I find that studying an entire set of works gives you a more complete view of a composer. It forces you to look at each and every piece and figure out how to convey the message in the most accurate and musical way. No shortcuts! No selecting the easiest or most popular works, then puffing oneself up as being an expert in the composer.

Inspiration Helps

Having a great piano as a practice instrument certainly was great inspiration. It’s the one highlight that I can truly credit since there’s a lot of loneliness inside the walls of a church sanctuary. By design, it’s a great environment for practicing, with no interruption from the outside world. However, I did appreciate hearing the occasional squirrel scampering across the roof.

Moving Forward

Once I say Auf Wiedersehen Bach WTC Book One, I will go back through each of the pieces as my daily bread. I will emphasize those several pieces that were just lightly practiced, in which I did a great disservice to the master, J.S. Bach. Besides memorizing a few of these pieces for use on future recitals, I do plan to offer all 24 preludes and fugues together in recital, not memorized. I need to find opportunities where I can play them all, but people can feel free to come and go as they wish. Even experiencing a few of these can reset the day’s worry meter, or give one a glimpse of the Almighty. Bach reminds us of this at the bottom of the final measure of music, with the following initials: S.D.G. 1

Footnote

1. Soli Deo Gloria – Glory to God alone. Used also by Handel, it’s a commonly used abbreviation among those not wanting to take credit for God’s gifts. It’s also the motto of the American Guild of Organists.

Johann Sebastian Bach, Courtesy Wikimedia
Posted 2019-11-24

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