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Let’s Practice Together

Introduction

A new year brings a new chance to commit to practice, so let’s practice together. After completing a rewrite and expansion of my 12 blog posts under the heading Classic Practice Corner, you might wonder why I’m writing yet another post on practice!

To be fair, many of those articles are only peripherally about practice, addressing other themes like theory, sight reading, and memory. I’m guessing most of you probably don’t even know about these posts. That’s okay; you’re busy. When you get a chance, visit my Teaching Posts page to learn more.

What Practice Looks Like for Me

My practice is going to look a lot different than yours because my goals are different. I have to prepare for weekly church services at First Methodist, so I schedule my practice for both instruments around the rehearsal and service time I spend in Bella Vista. That means my practice is not every day. When I do practice, it’s often for 2 to 3 hours per session.

How I Track My Practice

I use the free version of an app called Toggl, which allows me to track both how much and what I’m practicing. I also have a notebook to write details about my practicing, but some days I do that better than others. I’m also posting a practice summary online just for fun. I did this for the first 4.5 months of 2021, and hope to get farther this year!

What Works For You?

The best device is a simple silent timer. You can set it to countdown – ding, you’re done. Or, if you like practicing, use it to accumulate time instead. A watch or clock also work. Whatever you choose, make sure to write down how much you practice, at least for a week or two, until you get a pattern established. For intermediate to advanced students, having some type of notebook to notate what you did can be really useful.

In Conclusion

Even if you generaly like practicing, it can be difficult to establish it on a regular basis. Younger kids with routine schedules have it easier than pre-teens and teens with second instruments, afterschool activities, and demanding sports schedules. That’s why establishing when you can practice is so crucial. Let’s practice together so we’re well prepared before that next festival or recital arrives!

Last Updated 2022-01-04 | Originally Posted 2022-01-04

Tough Social Media Decisions for 2022

Introduction

On the last day of 2021, I had the time to take a look at what went wrong with my social media strategy. I’m all for being active on social media, but I need to find out how to be more efficient or I’ll just abandon it for weeks at a time. What I discovered is that I wasn’t delineating between the two separate things I do, teaching and performing. Each needs to have its own strategy, and from there I need to develop easier tactics to manage content for each audience.

The Big Mistake

I’ve been prioritizing my performing content over my teaching content. Big mistake! Almost all of my performance income comes from my church job. My part-time paycheck isn’t going to fluctuate based on my social media posting. However, running good social media is one of the keys to gaining and retaining students. I have 20 or so piano parent families to please, who can put in their notice at any time.

Analysis – Overall

I looked back through my recent Instagram and Facebook history to see how I’m engaging. Since I stopped posting videos directly to Facebook, my reach has shrunk significantly, to the point where I had no likes from the last several videos I posted as links on both sides of my business. I always get a smattering of likes and the occasional comments on Instagram for identical posts. It’s clear that Facebook prioritizes posts with video versus links. That brings up a little side topic that I have to broach, as to why I stopped posting videos directly on Facebook servers.

Bot Blocking

I apologize for how that heading sounds, but it’s very appropriate to my argument! When you post a lot of classical performances, you will notice that you’ll get a message from Facebook that one of your recordings has been flagged and muted. Bots run by the major record labels, with the blessing of Facebook, are continually trolling to detect potential pirated recordings.

I understand why companies that have spent millions to build their catalogs would want to spend millions on bots to protect their assets. However, it becomes really annoying to get multiple notifications of possible violations of videos I’ve posted of Bach and Beethoven. At first, I took it as a compliment that my recordings were similar to Brendel and Barenboim. However, that wore out fast as more and more recordings got called into question.

If a human took a second to look at my recordings, she could tell I’m neither of those fine pianists! This has become a real problem for performers who make their primary income from performing, according to this Washington Post article. After an increase in this flagging and muting activity, it was time to switch to a paid host for my recordings. I pay for the lowest tier of Vimeo since the free tier is extremely limited. Even at that, it’s almost $100 per year. It gives me control over my own recordings.

Analysis – Teaching

Getting back to social media strategy now…When I did more digging, I found that most of my piano parents engage primarily through Instagram, not Facebook. I only know of one family that engages with Facebook only. I’d really like to consistently upload student videos to IGTV so that they get clicked and shared. In exchange for a bit of extra work to set up an IGTV video, I get a golden opportunity to market my studio with the help of my piano parents.

I don’t like the idea of abandoning users on Facebook, but due to the algorithm, it’s very unlikely they’ll see my content anyway. According to this article, organic reach on Facebook is currently 5.2%. That means that only one out of 19 followers will see the average non-promoted post. I really don’t like those odds, and am not going to pay to play to achieve a better reach rate.

Analysis – Performing

I’ll confess: Pretty much everything I post for performing is really vanity. I really enjoy performing and pride myself on being that teacher who can play every piece he teaches. However, spending so much time preparing recordings for social media is not contributing to the top line. So, I decided not to build my catalog on Vimeo instead of making IGTV videos. Anyone truly interested in hearing me will hopefully click through the link in bio.

I get it, most won’t! It takes maybe 5 to 10 seconds to click through three extra links on Instagram, and a bit less to click through one link on Facebook. Those folks were probably were only going to watch for 5 to 10 seconds anyway. So why bother? I want to show that I’m an active performer and that I take pride in what I play, which translates into my teaching. Tactically, it’s really simple to use a third-party app like Later to schedule to both Instagram and Facebook at the same time. I don’t have to abandon any of my current followers.

Scheduling

To keep things simple, I decided that I should batch each week, for the weeks that I will post. I’ll continue to do Music Monday for my performances, and add Teaching Tuesday (working title) for my studio posts. If I want to post for any other reason, I’ll choose one of the remaining weekdays, possibly Thursday, so there is some space between posts. I tire of some folks who post for posting’s sake, and mute or unfollow them accordingly.

In Conclusion

If you’ve made it this far, bravo. I tried to keep this as short as possible, but of course, social media strategy is not a simple one. If it were, I wouldn’t be writing this blog post about it. Does this approach make sense to you, at least for my rather unique situation? How do you handle planning your social media? Have you taken the time to look at what you’re doing, to see if there’s a better way?

Last Updated 2022-01-01 | Originally Posted 2022-01-01

Good Enough

Introduction

“Never good enough” was the original title I proposed for this post. That along with “How to discourage and demoralize a piano student” as the short description. I hope it’s obvious I don’t endorse any of this “never good enough” stuff. However, I experienced it first hand during my first two years of piano study at music school. I noticed a lot of this, across many students and teachers, during the six years I spent earning my BFA and MM degrees.

I realize that I had a lot to learn and that constructive criticism is key to learning how to make a piece better. However, spending an inordinate amount of time on a piece and picking it to death is not the road to success.

Several Possibilities

When a piece isn’t getting better, it might come down to insufficient practice time. For a performance major in a degree program at a music conservatory, you’d hope that’s not the case. However, I find that often in school-aged children in my own private teaching. Sometimes a student gets to a particular point and doesn’t have the time or motivation to pick the piece apart further.

In many such cases, I’ll just suggest that the piece is put to the side for now. Typically, much work has been done, and the piece will be better approached with fresh eyes several months down the road. In the meantime, I might assign a similar piece by the same composer or era, since that can deepen understanding. Of course, there are times where we have to push to the finish. Then, I’ll try to help pick apart the most challenging spots to give the student that last push.

In some cases, I may have misjudged the difficulty. The student has really tried his best but just isn’t ready to make more progress. This sometimes happens with what I call stretch pieces, pieces that are intentionally assigned above the student’s current level. This can help the student to reach beyond her limitations, but it can also lead to a dead end. Even if the piece can’t be completed right now, it can always be reconsidered down the road.

Balancing the Load

Students tend to learn best when their repertoire is at a level that nudges them without overwhelming them. I often rely on graded repertoire books to help me do that. However, there are times when I want to push a student by intentionally assigning a level or two above where they are currently studying. I have tried this with transfer students if I suspect that they have not been challenged enough.

Part of balancing the load is to know when to assign pieces that are below the current level of study. I routinely suggest that approach at Christmas, where a student will want to learn several pieces in several weeks. There just isn’t enough time to learn at level, unless the student will be satisfied to learn one piece over several weeks. That’s a better fit for an advanced student who might be entering a competition or talent show and understands the benefit of working on a piece longer.

In Conclusion

It’s easy for a piano teacher to go into criticism mode and not see the bigger picture. There is an optimal path for each piece assigned to a student and it’s up to the teacher to sniff that out. Sometimes a piece is close to recital ready, and a student should be given another week to do better. Another student might be near his limits, and it’s time to call it. Good enough. Be honest and don’t sugarcoat, but also acknowledge the progress that has happened. Tomorrow is another chance to do better.

Last Updated 2021-11-22 | Originally Posted 2021-11-22

Lessons from My Website Hacking

Introduction

I found my Website hacked on November 11, 2021, and spent half the night trying to recover it. I found this out by accident while I was doing some other maintenance. Before explaining more, here’s my setup: This WordPress instance is pre-loaded using what’s called WP Hosting. That means that I don’t have cPanel for this instance, which turned out to be a minor detail in how I proceeded. (I do use cPanel on a separate server that I use strictly for testing.)

Identifying the Issue

The type of hacking that I found is called a malicious redirect. It means that the hacker diverted my visitors to a ridiculous gaming site that clearly was not mine. What made the diagnosis difficult was that my admin panel seemed to be working correctly. I also was able to access my site since my browser was already logged in.

The only way I could test for this redirect as visitors experienced it was to access my site via a separate browser that I don’t have logged in for maintenance. I always keep a spare browser for testing, but I never considered it for this purpose since this is the first time I’ve been hacked.

Running Site Health under the Tools menu clearly identified the problem. I was a bit disappointed in the Sucuri security plugin because it didn’t alert me to the problem. It’s possible that the hackers diverted any emails it was trying to send, just like they made it impossible for me to restore my code from my backup software.

Relying on my Hosting Company

I have generally had a good experience with my hosting company, even though they are a smaller player that is not well known. The only issue I’ve found is that it can take a LONG time to resolve issues because they offer chat-only support. It often takes a while for them to identify the issue and get you to the person that can best help you.

My first instinct was to ask them to delete my current instance of WordPress, which I can’t do myself given that I don’t have cPanel access. Then I would have reloaded everything from a save point that was virus-free. They actually had a better solution, and in one fell swoop, disabled the malicious redirect by disabling all of my plugins.

Recovery

From that point, I installed Wordfence, on the recommendation of my hosting company desk, and uninstalled Sucuri. It has a scanning tool that will identify and quarantine malicious code, much like a standard virus scanner.

I reloaded my code from a point before I suspect I was hacked, and that worked given that the malicious code didn’t prevent it this time. Wordfence also provides a firewall that automatically activates after a week of self-learning. When I saw that happen a couple of days ago, I was even happier.

More Cleanup

I invited this attack by having way too many plugins. In a few cases, I forgot what they did and why I installed them. My old method of discovering plugins with potential was to install first, configure later. Of course, I often never ended up configuring them. Now, I log any new plugins that I read about into an Evernote document that details all of my Website changes. That way, if I really want to try something out, I can do it when I have the time to configure it properly and test whether I want to keep it installed.

I uninstalled the most recent plugin that I installed, which I think was the source of the hack, and I deleted 10 others as well. Several other plugins are targeted for future elimination in that same Evernote document. I got some great advice from the community at WPBeginner.com: Install plugins to solve a business need, not just because they’re fun to use. Less is definitely more when it comes to plugins!

Steps I’d Recommend to Prevent Being Hacked

  • Install only the plugins that you need. Remember that every plugin you install is like handing a stranger a key to your house and hoping they won’t abuse the privilege.
  • Keep a log of plugin or other configuration changes that you make. A plugin like Simple History will show you recent changes, but your own document will help you remember why you installed something and whether it’s still important.
  • Install a plugin that does automatic backups, if you’re not already doing so. Also, remember to do some secondary backups from time to time in a separate place, just in case.
  • Use Site Check from the Tools menu. It’s so easy to use and provides advice you should follow.
  • Install a good security plugin that will provide scanning and firewall. Wordfence does both in its free version.
  • Allow WordPress versions, themes, and plugins to update automatically. Hackers can exploit mismatches in these, or can get into your site through a recognized leak that is waiting for you to manually update.
  • Install a separate Web browser that you don’t normally use, and only use it for testing. Don’t log into wp-admin from it or it will be useless in this regard.
  • Rely on your hosting service to give you advice. They likely won’t solve your issues but will guide you along the way. If you’re just given a bunch of documents to read with no concrete help, ask to be boosted to a higher level of support.

In Conclusion

I hope my story can save at least one other person from getting hacked. In that case, it was well worth the time it took to flesh this out. I will update this document from time to time with best practices I learn along the way. Have you had any experiences of getting hacked? How did you deal with it?

One thing I didn’t mention was never a real possibility for me but should be considered nonetheless. The companies that make security plugins also have teams at the ready to clean infected Websites. The bad news? Prices start at $200 and go way higher. I wanted to learn how to recover from this so that I could be better prepared against future hacking attempts.

Last Updated 2021-11-21 | Originally Posted 2021-11-21

Halloween Piano Party 2021

Introduction

This past Saturday, October 23rd, we had our third annual Halloween Piano Party. The event made its debut in 2018 but skipped last year due to the pandemic. I decided to do things a little bit differently this year. Instead of doing one event for all, I set up four rolling start times each half-hour so that people wouldn’t have to stay for the entire event. It enabled folks to rotate people in and out of the room so that we had adequate social distance. We all wore masks (the Covid-19 type) except during photos and playing.

Every year is a bit different, but like other years, we had a lot of day-before cancellations. That can be frustrating, like when six students scheduled in the first time block imploded to just one. However, everything turned out okay. The 11 students and their families that showed up made the event a success. They seemed glad that they had attended, and I even got a couple of nice thank you emails following the event!

Seven contestants and one toothy pumpkin!

Perfection Wasn’t the Goal

Two of the students got to play their memorized pieces for the Sonata/Sonatina Celebration coming up in two weeks. Everyone else got a chance to play whatever they were working on or finished this fall. The goal wasn’t thoroughly-polished, recital-worthy performances. It was simply to remember what it is to play in public, or perhaps for the first time with a supportive audience. Having plenty of opportunities to perform is important, as I mentioned in this older blog post that I just revised.

Tara was the winner of the costume contest, judged by five piano teachers from Ireland, Canada, and the United States following the event.

Candy and Apples

I had some filler Halloween improvisation pieces ready to teach, but as it turned out they weren’t necessary. I have enough older students playing longer pieces that the time flew by! Everyone sanitized their hands after playing, then got a chance to pick up snacks and an apple from the Trick or Treat table.

Prior Year Halloween Piano Parties

Originally Posted 2021-10-29 | Last Updated 2021-10-29

Terrific Technique

Introduction

What is terrific technique? It’s an aspiration for any pianist at any level because it makes playing easier. What’s not easy is talking about it. I realized there must be a reason that I hadn’t covered this topic previously in my Practice Corner articles. Is it because technique is a given, and doesn’t merit discussion? Or is it just a harder topic to flesh out? I think it’s both!

Simply put, it’s the nuts and bolts of piano playing. But there’s a lot more. Theory. Injury prevention. The way to scale up to harder pieces. Let’s look at each of these a bit more.

Nuts and Bolts

Everything we study in technique is in preparation for playing repertoire. The seven animal techniques we study in Piano Safari are immediately followed by pieces that contain those elements. Five-finger patterns, diatonic and chromatic scales, and arpeggios show up regularly in piano literature. By learning these in advance, we can more easily tackle pieces that have these elements included.

Theory

Studying 5-finger patterns, scales, and arpeggios is a great introduction to music theory. We need to know what sharps and flats appear in each key and learn the triads (chords) that are commonly found in each of these keys. That leads to discussing simple chord progressions, and identifying these in the pieces we’re playing. This kind of theory work can also help in memorizing pieces. Often, just a basic awareness of chords can help in those transitions where different sections go in different harmonic directions.

Injury Prevention

When I Googled the topic of teaching technique, I was looking to make sure I didn’t miss anything obvious. Even though I’ve lectured on and written about the Arrau Technique, injury prevention wasn’t top of mind when I was determined to finally write this post. That sort of makes sense, because injury prevention often only comes to mind after the injury has occurred. People sometimes require carpal tunnel surgery. Other pianists go to study the Taubman technique post-injury. I was lucky to find a teacher and a way of playing that prevented those injuries in the first place.

Many pianists and teachers know how to play in a healthy way. One of the reasons that I wanted to learn more about Piano Safari is that the animal techniques are very sound and similar to how I was taught to play. I asked Julie Knerr where she developed these techniques, and she said that they came from a variety of leading pedagogues. That said, not every teacher is enlightened on how to play and teach healthy technique. Your body will typically give you plenty of warning if you’re on the wrong path.

Harder Pieces

Playing correctly and having good technique helps when it’s time to try pieces that are more difficult than what we’re comfortable playing. For the past many years, I wanted to learn the Goyescas of Granados, among other difficult pieces. Every time I approached the first piece, Los Requiebros, I only got as far as the third page. It’s just so hard. But, as I dug in a little more, I was able to work through that piece, and a couple of the others, even though only one of them is ready for prime time.

In Conclusion

Technique is one of the four pillars of my teaching, along with rote playing, improvisation, and note reading. Over time, as students pass from beginners to intermediate players, rote playing and improvisation fade to occasional treats. At that point, technique remains a part of lessons along with the study of repertoire. Acquiring terrific technique may not always be fun, but it is so worthwhile. Each higher level of playing opens a student up to a whole new set of composers and pieces to discover.

Last Updated 2021-10-25 | Originally Posted 2021-10-25

What A Lesson Looks Like

Introduction

Many prospective piano parents ask me how I teach. I prefer to answer with what a lesson looks like since that removes a lot of the variables that go into this very loaded question. Just to simplify this a bit, I’m going to describe here what a lesson looks like for a beginner. I teach intermediate and advanced students as well, but they tend to be much more customized since they involve older students.

Rote Playing

You’re probably wondering why I didn’t mention note reading first, since it is a fundamental skill since modern staff notation was invented 1000 years ago. While note reading is extremely important, more important is getting the child immersed in playing the piano. Many adults also enjoy rote playing, as an addition to their regular written pieces, because it gives them a break from studying the written page. In one 30-minute first lesson, I can teach 2 or 3 rote pieces that give the student the chance to immediately connect with the instrument.


What Is Rote Playing?

Simply put, it’s a way of learning that resembles how we typically experience many of our first experiences in life, like tying our shoes or riding a bike. Small patterns are introduced in a follow-the-leader style. Those patterns are put together to form a short piece. Each new piece will become more complex, by adding additional fingers or more complex rhythms. In short, it’s the quickest way to learn a simple piece when you haven’t spent many months learning the intricacies of note reading.


Is learning the piano always fun and easy? No and no! But there has to be some element of both of these in lessons and practice, or interest will wane quickly. Rote playing connects the ears, hands, and brain of the student in a way note reading doesn’t. Besides giving the student a quick way to build repertoire, it prepares her to deal with note reading challenges when they are presented.

Note Reading

Note reading is what would be considered a traditional approach, and it’s still an important part of lessons. I’m including all of the pieces learned as a result of learning this notation. For the typical beginner, much of the challenge in learning a new piece is deciphering the notation versus the difficulty in playing the piece. This can be seen in how readily they pick up rote playing, which subtracts the reading element.

In the piano method I typically use, Piano Safari, reading is approached carefully and methodically for younger students. For older students, grand staff reading occurs much more quickly. Younger students start with pre-notation reading on the black keys, then proceed to the white notes as they become more familiar with the note names. Once that’s comfortable, grand staff reading is presented.

Technique

Technique is important in playing, but the youngest student needs to have experience with playing with one or two fingers before getting all five fingers involved. Piano Safari presents an innovative set of simple skills called Animal Techniques. They comprise seven building blocks of piano technique, which we would learn otherwise haphazardly as a piece calls for them. By learning these techniques early, we can set a great foundation for playing that will help for a lifetime of piano playing.

I start my students on pentascales, also called 5-finger patterns, as soon as they are operating with all five fingers. Once pentascales are fluent, we go on to learning 2-octave scales. That’s about as far as we get at the beginner level. Learning technique is foundational for playing. By working consistently on it as a separate discipline, we encounter difficulties that will eventually appear in their pieces.

Improvisation

Improvisation is an activity that I’ve come to appreciate later in life. When I was a kid, I was never introduced to it. I never enjoyed composition, which is considered to be the written form of improvisation. The good news is that you can enjoy improv, and even become really good at it, without moving on to the composition stage.

Music improvisation simply means to doodle. It’s the musical equivalent of drawing on a napkin or scrap paper. That’s really different than composition, which is like getting out the oil pants and applying the brush to canvas. Improv for kids typically involves a set of rules or limitations intended to make the process less overwhelming. At first, it might involve just the notes that are under one hand, and playing just quarter notes. Later, we can extend the range of notes and rhythms, which can lead to short pieces.

Some kids really enjoy this and do it at home as part of their practice. Others try it but don’t really enjoy it. The important thing is that they get a chance to be the creator of their own works instead of just the interpreter of other people’s compositions.

Conclusion

I’ve introduced you to four activities that comprise a beginner’s lesson. We sometimes don’t get to do all of these activities every week. However, I try to rotate them in, so that each activity happens fairly regularly. Lessons are a wonderful chance to learn about and make a connection with music. I love exploring alongside each child to encourage and bring out their creativity in ways that often surprise them.

Last Updated 2021-10-09 | Originally Posted 2021-10-08

Going the Second Mile

Introduction

I remember seeing this expression on a motivational poster decades ago, where a runner is shown in full stride with no one else in sight. I get it, the others gave up before going the second mile. It’s an interesting expression in the figurative but not literal sense since real runners don’t tire easily. Most wouldn’t probably even bother to lace up for just one mile!

Origin of the Expression

However, it turns out that this expression isn’t about runners at all. Going the Second Mile has Roman and Biblical roots. As you may know, one of the feats of the Roman empire was to create an elaborate road network not previously seen in the ancient world. The expression “Many roads lead to Rome” comes from that. Any Roman soldier or citizen could ask anyone traveling along the road to help carry his/her load for exactly one mile. In Matthew 5:41, Jesus tells anyone who is so asked to go two miles. Of course, Jesus doesn’t say just go an extra 100 yards; he makes it clear we are to go far beyond what is expected!

Inspiration to Carry On

I think about this instruction when inspiration is lacking, and the urge to quit is swelling! Sometimes the burden seems too heavy, and just getting done sounds good. I won’t lie, I often feel that it’s hard to keep going and I just want to quit early. That’s true whether I’m trying to make my step count for the day, at the computer, or on the music bench. I try to keep thinking how good it will be to complete that second mile, and sometimes it works!

The Struggle of Piano Students

I’ve seen the same struggle at work in my piano students, particularly as they arrive into the early intermediate repertoire, where pieces double in length and become more complex between the hands. Some of them come to lessons with a first-mile attitude. You can see it when they come in saying they only practiced hands separately, or that they’ve only gotten a partial way through their piece. To be fair, there are some advanced pieces that require several weeks to get through. That’s not what I’m talking about here. I’m talking about bringing a beginner mindset to intermediate pieces. They haven’t fully embraced arriving at the higher level.

However, some of my students don’t seem phased by longer and harder pieces. They try their best, and they sometimes surprise me at how far they’ve gotten or the achievement they’ve shown. They’ve learned the secret that a piece double the length isn’t necessarily double the work. Lots of those passages repeat. They are much better readers than they used to be and can cover more measures in a practice session than they used to be able to cover. They’re okay with certain passages being complex and don’t just stop and give up when they encounter a hard passage. They know I’m here to help them figure those out.

Thoughts?

What are your struggles in going the second mile? Where do you find it easy or difficult to go on?

Last Updated 2021-09-21 | Originally Posted 2021-09-19

Train Your Ears

Introduction

Ear training isn’t something that I do enough with my students. It’s really difficult trying to fit so much into a half-hour lesson, which is the length of time that most of my students choose. I use the phrase train your ears, because I’m going way beyond the discipline of listening for intervals. It also involves listening to styles of music. You need to use different types of articulation. Hearing with precision is an important part of playing with precision. Let’s get the dissonance out of the way first!

Dissonant Intervals

A dissonant interval is one that sounds wrong. Technically speaking, it’s either a 2nd, 7th, or a tritone, which itself has two different names! Each of the above intervals, when played in isolation, sounds like someone made a mistake. That’s frequently the case, since dissonant intervals aren’t a large part of beginner repertoire, except when a mistake is made. I try to use the mistake as a learning opportunity, so I say “Does that sound right?” Most of my students will instantly know that I only ask that question when it doesn’t sound right!

Sometimes, the student played the correct notes but is practicing at a slow tempo that exaggerates the dissonance. In other words, when sped up to a proper tempo, the dissonance will make more sense as a part of the longer phrase. In cases like that, I point out that such dissonances are ways of transitioning between consonant intervals on either side. Sometimes it takes a brief dissonance to travel between those two places.

I especially love discussing the tritone. It’s a series of three whole steps connected together, which make a sound that is very unstable, and typically resolves up to a 6th, or down to a 3rd. It’s a fun interval to discuss in lessons since for centuries it was considered the devil’s interval. It certainly has the sound of conjuring no good when heard in isolation. However, these two notes are sometimes just part of a larger dominant 7th or 9th chord, and the notes determining that are in the opposite hand.

Consonant Intervals

Technically speaking, the 3rd and 6th are the consonant intervals, while the 4th, 5th, and octave are perfect intervals. I will take students through the differences between these intervals when it’s the right time during theory discussions. However, for the purpose of this post, I’m mostly concerned about the differences between notes that sound right and those that don’t.

Listening for Inversions

Listening goes well beyond whether something sounds correct or not. It also concerns whether a chord or note is played in the correct disposition. I’m not talking about whether it’s sunny or cranky, but what note is at the bottom. In any chord, we can have the root at the bottom, called root position. Sometimes the third or fifth is at the bottom, which is called first or second inversion, respectively. This gets a bit complex, but essentially we need to listen to determine that the notated chord is what we played.

Listening for Style

Often it can be helpful listening to a recording, especially when the style of the piece is unfamiliar. Even in beginner pieces, there’s sometimes an indication that the eighth notes, which are written as though they are even, are to be played in a swing style. In that case, they sound like they belong to a triplet, where the first note is twice as long as the second.

Some styles of music are hard to pick up from the page. I’d include anything that isn’t standard to our ears. I worked with an early advanced student on a Bossa Nova piece that just didn’t click until he listened to a recording of the piece. The printed score is where we start, but it shouldn’t be where we end our work!

Listening for Articulation

Broadly brushed, there are three basic articulations, with increasing length, from staccato to detached to legato. These are details that aren’t emphasized in depth at the very beginning of musical study, but become more important as the student climbs through the beginner levels. A performer on a recording making these differences can often help the student understand how to produce them herself.

In Conclusion

This is just an example of the type of listening we do in lessons, in order to try to connect the notation on the page to the notes on the piano. Combining theory with listening can be an effective technique, even if I don’t point that out per se. Students who become good critical listeners to their own playing tend to be more successful pianists. For that reason alone, I try to let the student figure out the error, instead of taking the easier route of pointing out what went wrong.

Image by Asoy ID from Pixabay
Last Updated 2021-09-18 | Originally Posted 2021-09-18

Two Tough Conversations with Prospective Piano Parents

Introduction

As a piano teacher, I find myself doing lots of things besides teaching lessons. For instance, I’ve added sanitizing skills to my arsenal! That includes supplying hydrogen peroxide and clean clothes to make sure the piano keys stay Covid-free! One of the more normal side activities is to speak to parents about teaching their kids. This happens a lot at the beginning of each semester. Turnover is part of the business due to the number of families that move into and out of our area each year.

I spent quite a lot of time on the phone recently to two parents who inquired about lessons. The difficulty in both of these cases was that the children are studying with other teachers. That’s not a conversation I ever enjoy having, even though there’s the possibility I could get a new student. These were two tough conversations!

Don’t Poach

I have no problem teaching a transfer student after a piano parent decides to switch teachers. Yet, I approach that situation with some trepidation. I don’t want to find myself on the short end of the stick as the next disappointing teacher! But, in no case would I ever try to persuade someone to switch to me. This needs to be the parent’s decision. I don’t poach!

First Conversation

The first conversation was with the parent of a 6-year-old child. The parent asked me if lack of performance opportunities might be a negative for her child. I said no, given that at that age, motivation from the lesson itself should be enough. Lessons should be fun and inspiring, which encourages practice at home. That creates a positive feedback loop. Performing is a nice add on for a young child, but it’s not a major focus. That 30-second performance at the end of the semester might be fun, but not a major factor.

There was a separate vibe I was getting that the lessons themselves might be the issue. The parent needs to observe the dynamic between teacher and student and to understand the goals being set. As for why practice isn’t happening, that’s more complex! The lessons might be boring and uninspiring. Or, the lessons might be fine, but the child isn’t getting enough structure so that regular practice happens at home. The best I could offer, besides the advice that the parent become a more intentional observer, was an evaluation lesson to give better feedback.

Side Note – Structure Comes from the Parent

Regular practice at home for young children starts with the parent. There are some kids who are self motivated, but that’s more the exception than the rule. There are some kids who rebel. Why? Some kids might have too many activities, but other might want to play. Immediately rewarding activities like Legos, Beyblades, or gaming compete hard with piano practice. I can only provide the instruction, not the practice structure at home.

Second Conversation

The second conversation was with the parent of a 12-year-old, who was generally happy with her child’s lessons. She, too, mentioned lack of performances as a reason she might switch teachers. Not knowing the child, I had no idea whether that child even liked to perform. Regular performance becomes more important as students mature as musicians and as people. That’s still not a reason for me to persuade the break up of what sounds like a good teacher/student relationship. I encouraged the parent to stay with the current teacher for now.

In Conclusion

I do offer lots of performance opportunities for my students, at least in normal times. During the pandemic, we can’t have recitals in person, or visit a retirement home. Performance has gone online for now, and that has pluses and minuses. My two tough conversations didn’t yield new students, and that’s okay. Perhaps each of these students would be a good addition to my studio at some later date. However, that has to be the parent’s decision, without coercion. Plus, I don’t want to jeopardize my good standing in the local teaching community. Yes, I have a few slots still available, but the right students will find me soon enough!

Image by user1505195587. Courtesy Pixabay.com
Originally Posted 2021-01-29 | Last Updated 2020-01-29